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Etobicoke & It's History

etobicoke

Location of Etobicoke (red) compared to the rest of Toronto.

Coordinates: 43°36′58″N 79°30′45″W Coordinates: 43°36′58″N 79°30′45″W

Population (2011)

Total 347,948 with density of 2,728.3/km2 (7,066/sq mi)

Time zone

EST (UTC-5); summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)

Postal code span

M8V-M9C, M9P-M9R, M9V-M9W

Area code(s)

416, 647

Etobicoke  (with a silent 'ke') is a former municipality within the western part of the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. First populated by First Nations, and then settled by Europeans in the 1790s, the municipality grew into city status in the 20th century. Several independent villages and towns developed within the area of Etobicoke, including Mimico, only to be later absorbed into Etobicoke during the era of Metro Toronto. Etobicoke itself was dissolved in 1998, when it was amalgamated with other Metro Toronto municipalities into the city of Toronto. Etobicoke is bordered on the south by Lake Ontario, on the east by the Humber River, on the west by Etobicoke Creek, the city of Mississauga and Toronto Pearson International Airport (though a small portion of the airport extends into Etobicoke) and on the north by Steeles Avenue West.

Today, Etobicoke's population (347,948 in 2011) is very diverse, with people from all over the world including Europeans, Asians, Middle Easterners, West Indians, Africans and South Asians. Etobicoke is still primarily suburban in development, with a lower population density than central Toronto, larger main streets, shopping malls and cul-de-sac housing developments. Etobicoke has several expressways within its borders, including the Queen Elizabeth Way, Gardiner Expressway, Ontario Highway 427, Ontario Highway 401 and Ontario Highway 409. Etobicoke is connected to the rest of Toronto by the Bloor-Danforth subway, which has its western terminus at Kipling Avenue. Etobicoke has one post-secondary institution: Humber College, which has two campuses.

History

Different groups of First Nations peoples used the land that is now Etobicoke at different times. As the Algonquins gradually moved west from the Atlantic to Lake Erie, it is almost certain that they would have occupied this land at some point.

etobicoke history mapThe name "Etobicoke" was derived from the Mississauga word wah-do-be-kang (wadoopikaang), meaning "place where the alders grow", which was used to describe the area between Etobicoke Creek and the Humber River. Etobicoke was intended by the British to be included in the Toronto Purchase of 1787. However, whether the western boundary of the purchase was the Humber River or the Etobicoke River (now, Etobicoke Creek) was disputed. The Mississauga Indians allowed British surveyor Alexander Aitkin to survey the disputed land, and the British paid an additional 10 shillings for the purchase, although the purchase was never formally agreed to. The dispute was eventually settled between the Government of Canada and the Mississaugas in 2010.

Settlers began to move in from Britain. Early settlers included many of the Queen's Rangers, who were given land in the area by Simcoe to help protect the new capital of Upper Canada. In 1793-95, the Honourable Samuel Smith, a colonel in the Queen's Rangers, received land grants of 1,530 acres (6.2 km2), extending from today's Kipling Avenue to Etobicoke Creek, and north to Bloor Street.

In 1911, the community of Mimico was incorporated on land taken from Etobicoke Township. New Toronto was incorporated on January 1, 1913. Early on, there was talk of merging Mimico and New Toronto. A 1916 referendum on amalgamating the two communities was approved by the residents of Mimico, but rejected by residents of New Toronto. In 1917, Mimico became a town and in 1920, New Toronto became the Town of New Toronto. Long Branch was incorporated in 1930 as a village.

In 1954, Etobicoke Township became a part of the newly formed regional government, the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto ("Metro"). In 1967, the township of Etobicoke was merged with three small lakeside municipalities — the Village of Long Branch, the Town of New Toronto, and the Town of Mimico — to form the Borough of Etobicoke. The borough was reincorporated as a city in 1984. In 1998, six local municipalities (including Etobicoke) and the Metropolitan Toronto government merged to form the amalgamated city of Toronto.

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Toronto Real Estate Board - IDX Last Updated: 9/17/2019 8:29:16 AM